First Lines Friday #2 – January 29th 2021

Happy Friday book lovers! 

It’s First Lines Friday, a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words

What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines? Here are the rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

 

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Here we go!

Long before we discovered that he had fathered two children by two different women, one in Drimoleague and one in Clonakilty, Father James Monroe stood on the altar of the Church of Our Lady, Star of the Sea, in the parish of Goleen, West Cork, and denounced my mother as a whore.

The family was seated together in the second pew, my grandfather on the aisle using his handkerchief to polish the bronze plaque engraved to the memory of his parents that was nailed to the back of the woodwork before him. He wore his Sunday suit, pressed the night before by my grandmother, who twisted her jasper rosary beads around her crooked fingers and moved her lips silently until he placed his hand atop hers and ordered her to be still. My six uncles, their dark hair glistening with rose-scented lacquer, sat next to her in ascending order of age and stupidity. Each was an inch shorter than the next and the disparity showed from behind. The boys did their best to stay awake that morning; there had been a dance the night before in Skull and they’d come home mouldy with the drink, sleeping only a few hours before being roused by their father for Mass.

 

THE REVEAL…

hearts invisible furies by john boyne

The Hearts Invisible Furies by John Boyne

I am 100 pages into this story and I am already completely invested. So far I have only really seen Cyril’s mother and the story of her exile from her home and where she ended up after that. The book is set in Ireland, which I love and I have already gasped in shock and laughed by socks off at certain parts. I can tell this is going to be an incredible read but it is a beast of a book (my paperback copy is over 700 pages!)

 

By turns savvy, witty and achingly sad, this is a novelist at the top of his game.’ Mail on Sunday

Forced to flee the scandal brewing in her hometown, Catherine Goggin finds herself pregnant and alone, in search of a new life at just sixteen. She knows she has no choice but to believe that the nun she entrusts her child to will find him a better life.

Cyril Avery is not a real Avery, or so his parents are constantly reminding him. Adopted as a baby, he’s never quite felt at home with the family that treats him more as a curious pet than a son. But it is all he has ever known.

And so begins one man’s desperate search to find his place in the world. Unspooling and unseeing, Cyril is a misguided, heart-breaking, heartbroken fool. Buffeted by the harsh winds of circumstance towards the one thing that might save him from himself, but when opportunity knocks, will he have the courage, finally, take it?

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